Paydirt (2020)

paydirt

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From the director of The Vigilante Diaries comes this tale of a man on a road to retirement with another on a road to redemption.

Damien Brooks is a British man who worked for the Sinaloa drug cartel boss El Gordo. Five years ago, Damien decided to screw over El Gordo and hide loads of cash inside of a deserted area. When the DEA catches wind, Sheriff Tucker had busted Damien and sent him to prison. However, due to the nature of the investigation, Tucker himself was investigated and forced to retire. Now, Damien is out of prison and he has some major plans.

Damien decides to track down the cache of money so he can go on and retire for good. He gets his old crew in, including beauty Layla and badass Cici; Geoff, the brains of the crew and Tony, the muscle of the bunch. Meanwhile, Sheriff Tucker, even though retired, has learned that Damien is finally out of prison and he decides to seek redemption by stopping Damien. However, Damien and his crew soon realize things are going to be more complicated than they ever imagined when El Gordo has also learned of Damien being released and seeks revenge.

One thing is for sure. Christian Sesma sure loves his action and he sure loves his storytelling. The creator of The Vigilante Diaries unleashes another action tale that has quite some twists and turns, including flashbacks that lead up to the present and we’re not just talking about the prologue. In one instance, we learn one of the other major characters has a major connection with someone close to the big boss’ daughter (hint: It’s not the “muscle” Tony, played by Paul Sloan). The twists and turns keep the film going as does the performances by the cast.

Leading the way is Luke Goss, who once again has been shining as a very good action talent. In this case, his character of Damien is quite the antihero as he has a target on his back due to his actions from five years ago. When a guy gathers his old crew to find a stolen cache of money that he is directly involved in, you know there are going to be plenty of people going after him. Enter Val Kilmer as Sheriff Tucker for one. The now retired sheriff decides to put his family life on the backburner and look for redemption by tracking Damien down. It is somewhat sad as we see his daughter having to suffer. The role of Tucker’s daughter is actually played by Kilmer’s real-life daughter Mercedes, who does quite a great job in a role that makes you feel sympathy for her. If there is a flaw, perhaps because of his past health issues, but Kilmer’s voice seems very badly dubbed, but the voice doesn’t take away Kilmer’s performance.

The crew themselves are a fun bunch to watch. Aside from Sloan’s tough as nails Tony, we have couple Layla and Cici, respectively played by Murielle Telio and V. Bozeman. Layla is the beauty who uses her looks to get what the crew needs while Cici is as is indicated, a badass who will use her street smarts and kickboxing skills when necessary. There also some help from the very cool sounding name Lou Cap, played by veteran Nick Vallelonga, who brings this performance reminiscent of something you would expect in a classic Martin Scorsese gangster flick.

Paydirt is quite a wild ride with Luke Goss on the verge of retirement with Val Kilmer on the verge of redemption, no matter what it could cost both of them. If you get confused a bit with the twists and turns, wait until the last few minutes where everything is explained. Then, you’ll see why this is a fun and wild ride of a movie.

WFG RATING: B+

Uncork’d Entertainment presents an Octane Entertainment/Ton of Hats/Seskri Productions film. Director: Christian Sesma. Producers: Luke Goss, Christian Sesma, Mike Hatton, and Jack Campbell. Writer: Christian Sesma. Cinematography: Stefan Colson. Editing: Eric Potter.

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