Andy Lau

A Fighter’s Blues (2000)

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Andy Lau’s 100th film shows a once broken man who finds himself on the verge of redemption.

After serving a fifteen-year sentence in prison, former kickboxer Mong Fu has been released. He decides to look for his one-time love, Pim Nanthasiri, an aspiring documentarian. However, he has learned the sad news that Pim was killed during the making of a documentary in the Golden Triangle. Fu learns that he has a daughter, Ploy, who is staying at a local orphanage run by Sister Mioko. However, Fu can’t bear to shake the memory of the night he killed local champion Chart Chai.

Despite his demons, he and Ploy slowly begin to bond. He even begins to warm up to Sister Mioko. However, at a national match where Ploy is cheering on, Fu has been spotted by Chart Chai’s former trainer, who tells everyone about Ploy’s father killing Chart Chai. An embarrassed Ploy denounces her father, who remembers that fateful night again and decides he must settle it once and for all. He has learned that Chart Chai’s trainer has trained six-time champion Tawon and in an effort to settle things, Fu challenges Tawon to a match in the ring.

Black Mask director Daniel Lee took the reins on this film, which he co-wrote with Cheung Chi-Sing and Lee Hau-Shek. The film is actually a kickboxing version of films such as Raging Bull where a fighter at the top of his game falls hard and seeks redemption. However, in the case of Andy Lau’s Mong Fu, the film opens with his release from prison and his quest for redemption.

It is clear why Andy Lau is one of the best actors in Hong Kong. In this film, he plays a broken man who is looking for both forgiveness and redemption if not anything else. While he has lost someone close to him, in the form of Pim, played in flashbacks by Thai actress Indira Jaroenpura (who has a bit of a resemblance here to Karen Mok), he learns of his and Pim’s daughter Ploy. Newcomer Apichaya Thanatthanapong, in what looks to be her only film role, does quite well in the role of Ploy, who has her doubts but eventually warns up to her long lost father.

Japanese actress Takako Tokiwa brings some great support as Sister Mioko, who runs the orphanage where Ploy stays until Fu enters both of their lives. While Lau trained in Muay Thai for his role, the film does feature some real-life Muay Thai champions. Samart Payarakoon, a veteran who retired from the ring in the late 80’s, plays the ill-fated Chart Chai while Niruj Soasudhcart plays the current six-time champion Tawon, who Fu challenges as a means to find redemption and forgiveness within both the Muay Thai community and within himself as well. Ridley Tsui’s experience as action director comes well into play in the in-ring fights.

A Fighter’s Blues is a really good film where it’s not about the fights, but about the drama. Andy Lau shows why he is one of Hong Kong’s great talents. His role is impressive both in and out of the ring while trying to find himself in the process.


China Star Entertainment Group presents a Teamwork Motion Pictures Limited production. Director: Daniel Lee. Producers: Andy Lau, Derek Yee, and Catherine Hun. Writers: Daniel Lee, Cheung Chi-Sing, and Lee Hau-Shek. Cinematography: Venus Keung, Sunny Tsang, and Thomas Yeung. Editing: Azrael Chung.

Cast: Andy Lau, Takako Tokiwa, Apichaya Thanatthanapong, Indira Jaroenpura, Dickens Chan, Calvin Poon, Kowit Wattanakul, Samart Payakaroon, Niruj Soasudchart, Ekachai Waritchaaporn.


Shock Wave (2017)

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Andy Lau becomes the target of a revenge plot as the fate of Hong Kong is in his hands in this Herman Yau-directed action thriller.

J.S. Cheung has risen through the ranks to become one of the most decorated officers of Hong Kong Police’s Explosive Ordinance Disposal unit. However, two years ago, he went undercover and worked for a criminal mastermind, Pang Tong, who like Cheung, is known for his skills with explosives. When Cheung helped stop a potential bank robbery, Pang escaped and has vowed revenge on Cheung, who has returned to the EOD unit and has begun a relationship with local teacher Carmen Li.

As part of his plot to seek revenge, Pang returns to Hong Kong and has taken the Cross Harbour Tunnel under siege by having everyone in the tunnel held hostage and threatening to blow it up if his demands are not met. Pang wants Cheung to return to ensure the safety of the hostages by first, forcing him and the police to release his brother Biao from prison. Biao has had a change of heart since Cheung busted him in the mission two years ago and has no interest in seeing his big brother. However, as complications arise, Cheung finds himself with the fate of Hong Kong in his hands.

Herman Yau is truly a force in Hong Kong cinema. His versatility has led him to tackle various genres. For one of his latest films, this action thriller, which he co-wrote with Erica Li, revolves around sealing the fate of the Cross Harbour Tunnel, an underwater connection between Kowloon and Causeway Bay and of course, the hero is someone with a connection to the one responsible for holding the tunnel hostage. Yes, the film does play like a Hong Kong-version of big blockbuster Hollywood action films, but there are some twists and turns set to keep the viewer engaged.

Andy Lau once again shows his prowess as a bankable lead in the role of J.S. Cheung, a member of the EOD who in the film’s opening, finds himself in an undercover investigation which involves infiltrating a criminal known for his expertise in explosives. The villain Pang Tong is well played by Jiang Wu, who seethes revenge for the bust two years ago. In a bold and smart move in the film, the love interest for Cheung is in no way glamorized, but rather an ordinary teacher played well by Song Jia. In their first meeting, Song’s Carmen is seen at a bar completely drunk and tells Cheung after meeting her at her school that she was only there that night because she wanted to see if she still “had it”, but it is clear that the relationship between Cheung and Carmen is not about having it, but is truly about love and caring for each other.

The action sequences are quite a delight to watch. From the vehicle chases to a finale that nearly rivals another Lau vehicle, Firestorm, for an insane shootout that ends with a shocker (no pun intended) of a finale that just boosts up the rating of the film. The opening chase alone is quite a watch as there are explosions involve including a final explosion (for the opening) that nearly sends a car in a tunnel, this becoming the catalyst of the core plot of the film.

Shock Wave is definitely a Hong Kong-equivalent of a blockbuster Hollywood film and who better than Andy Lau to lead the way in this tense thriller. Some notable twists and turns help make this one to definitely check out.


A Universe Entertainment and Infinitus Entertainment Ltd. Production in association with Bona Film Group. Director: Herman Yau. Producers: Andy Lam, Alvin Lam, Jessica Chan, Esther Koo, and Alice Chan. Writers: Herman Yau and Erica Li. Cinematography: Joe Chan and Mandy Ngai. Editing: Azrael Chung.

Cast: Andy Lau, Jiang Wu, Song Jia, Philip Keung, Ron Ng, Babyjohn Choi, Louis Cheung, Wang Ziyi, Felix Wong, Sek Sau, Liu Kai-Chi, Cheung Chun-Kit.

Chasing the Dragon (2017)

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Donnie Yen stars in this fact-based film on the life of one of Hong Kong’s most notorious drug lords with Andy Lau reprising a role from a two-film series in the 1990’s.

In the year 1960, a man named Ho and his three best friends escaped China and headed for Hong Kong. There, they make their money by joining gangs in street fights. During one fateful night, Ho and his men find themselves enraging a British police officer, Hunter. However, they are saved by Lee Rock, a recently promoted sergeant major who is as corrupt as his fellow officers, but has the smarts to outwits those who rank above him. Ho and his friends one day incur the wrath of crime lord Chubby, who offers Ho and the others a job after Ho proves himself to have impeccable fighting skills.

As the years go by, Ho gains respect within the ghetto known as the Walled City. Plagued with issues involving his brother, who has dropped out of school and has become a drug addict, to the possible idea of a double cross, when Ho learns that Lee is set up to be framed and killed by the nephew of Walled City’s top gangster Master Dane, Ho saves Lee only to be betrayed by his now former boss, who cripples Ho. No longer being able to fight, Ho decides to use his street smarts when he joins forces with Lee Rock. However, with power comes greed and Ho soon finds himself biting the hand that feeds him as he is set to play a dangerous game that could cost many lives.

Surprisingly, one would never have thought that someone like Wong Jing, who has been more known for his buffoonery of films in the 1990’s, would have written this film let alone direct it. However, he collaborated with cinematographer Jason Kwan, who shares both writing and directing with Wong. However, Wong has had his fair share of serious films such as his Colour gangster film series and he has executive produced the original Young and Dangerous films. It is safe to say that if he’s not out there doing goofball-style films, then gangster films are truly his forte.

It is clear that action star Donnie Yen is slowly branching out into roles that allow him to do both his frenetic action skills and even turn in some dramatic chops as well. Ip Man was just the beginning of that transition period, but this film is truly becoming to take that cake. In what is a very bold move, Yen gets to mesh the two strengths in the first half of the film only to take the dramatic side in the second half as his character is in fact crippled. Yen’s character Crippled Ho is based on a real-life Hong Kong gangster, Ng Sek-Ho, who was one of Hong Kong’s most notorious drug lords. Yen pulls off all the stops to tackle the role and does quite a great job of it.

As for Andy Lau, the Heavenly King returns to a familiar role. In 1991, he starred in a two-part film series produced by Wong and directed by Lawrence Lau entitled Lee Rock. The film series was based on Lui Lok, a real-life officer who was involved in major corruption during the 60’s and 70’s. Lau reprises that role and having played the role before, he just seems like a natural fit. Not only does this film bring some excitement that we have Donnie Yen and Andy Lau in the same film, but they actually play each other well.

What many will find extremely important is that while the focus of the film is on Crippled Ho and Lee Rock, the film has no real good guys at all. As a matter of fact, all of the important characters are extremely bad guys with no remorse towards their actions. Aside from Ho and Lee, we have Kent Tong’s Ngan Tong, who starts out as Lee’s superior only to become his biggest rival within the ranks of the police force. Bryan Larkin’s Hunter is the notorious British officer who has a hatred towards Chinese and yet, he finds himself in a situation where he and Lee have to show some sort of respect towards each other because of their profession. Even Ben Ng’s Chubby switches gears from ruthless to benevolent to even more ruthless as it is he who seals Ho’s fate in the first half of the film.

Chasing the Dragon is a film that proves that one, Wong Jing can make some pretty good serious films; two, Donnie Yen can be a solid actor with dramatic chops; and three, just because a film is about gangsters, there don’t need to be any good guys and this is a film where all the important characters are notorious and if need be, ruthless.


An Infinitus Motion Picture/Bona Film Group/Sun Entertainment Culture Limited/Mega-Vision Project Workshop Limited production in association with Sil-Metropole Organisation, Rock Partner Films, and Red Carpet Cultural Industry Investment Fund. Directors: Wong Jing and Jason Kwan. Producers: Wong Jing, Donnie Yen, Andy Lau, Connie Wong, Ren Yue, Jeffrey Chan, Stanley Tong, and Yang Guang. Writers: Wong Jing, Jason Kwan, Philip Lui, and Howard Yip. Cinematography: Jason Kwan, Ko Chiu-Lam, and Jimmy Kwok. Editing: Li Ka-Wing.

Cast: Donnie Yen, Andy Lau, Kent Cheng, Ben Ng, Kent Tong, Phillip Keung, Wilfred Lau, Yu Kang, Michelle Hu, Xu Dong-Dong, Felix Wong, Niki Chow, Bryan Larkin, Philip Ng, Jonathan Lee, Lawrence Chou, Wang Qianyu.


The Adventurers (2017)

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Andy Lau attempts at the biggest heist of his life in this loose adaptation of a John Woo classic from actor/musician turned director Stephen Fung.

Five years ago, master thief Zhang Dan attempted to steal one third of a prominent necklace known as Gaia. However, he found himself set up and put in prison. Having now been released, Zhang intends to find out who set him up while attempting to get the remaining pieces of Gaia so he can retire. Joining forces with his protege Chen Po and new team member Red Ye, Zhang finds himself trailed by French police officer Pierre, who was the very officer who put Zhang in jail five years ago.

When Zhang and his team successfully infiltrate a popular actress’ event and steals her necklace, which was up for auction for a charity, Zhang has one piece left to get. To accomplish this, Zhang must use Red as a pawn to infiltrate rich man Charlie Luo to get that final piece of Gaia. Meanwhile, Pierre finds himself an ally in Amber Li, an expert in curation who was once Zhang’s fiancee. While Pierre and Amber are hot on Zhang’s trail, complications will soon arise, threatening to end this final heist for the master thief.

You have got to hand it to Stephen Fung. The actor and musician turned director has churned out quite a filmography when it comes to his directing. From his directorial debut in 2004’s Enter the Phoenix to 2012’s kung fu-steampunk hybrid Tai Chi Zero and Tai Chi Hero, Fung’s brand of action has gained quite a following. His latest film, a loose adaptation of the John Woo classic Once a Thief, is a fun and wild action ride that keeps you wanting to root for our central character, master thief Zhang Dan.

And who better to play this thief than the Heavenly King Andy Lau? Lau is wonderful as the central character who thrives in doing his job but still feels conflicted. Having been released from prison in the film’s opening, Zhang feels he must get the job done as well as find out who was responsible for putting him in prison in the first place. The legendary Jean Reno serves as the “cat” to Lau’s “mouse” in the game as his Pierre is convinced that Zhang is not finished with business yet. However, despite his misgivings, there seems to be a line of respect between the two that goes back to the very day Zhang is arrested, resulting in that prison time.

Yo Yang serves up comic relief as Zhang’s protege Po, who when doing his scenes with Shu Qi (who married director Fung during the making of the film), attempts at wooing her with well, the expected results of rejection. Zhang Jingchu is perhaps the most conflicted character in Amber, the ex-fiancee of Zhang who wants to help Pierre perhaps for revenge, but yet still has a bit of a flame for her ex-lover. Eric Tsang makes the most of his role as Kong, Zhang’s mentor and handler, while Sha Yi gets the most of his role as Charlie, the owner of one of the Gaia pieces, with whom Shu Qi must use some flirtation with in order for the team to nab it.

The action sequences are quite fun. While they don’t really comprise of fistacuffs, they are still fun nonetheless. There are vehicle chase scenes that are up to par with the likes of The Transporter and Ronin amongst others. Shane Hurlbut’s cinematography is quite impressive when it comes to both action and the amazing aerial shots of the cities the film was set in, as Fung decided to use drone technology to capture these amazing views of the cities.

In conclusion, The Adventurers is a pretty fun heist flick. It is clear why Stephen Fung has truly made his mark on directing action films. Some great performances by Andy Lau and Jean Reno, blended some some stunning cinematography of the cities and some nice twists and turns in the film make this worth checking out.


Infinitus Motion Pictures present a Mannix Filming Co. Ltd. Production in association with Media Asia Films. Director: Stephen Fung. Producers: Stephen Fung, Andy Lau, Jiang Ping, Chen Jiande, Tomas Krejci, and Radomir Docekai. Writers: Stephen Fung, Lo Yiu-Fai, Steve Ha, Cheung Chi-Kwong, and Wong Hiu-Chong. Cinematography: Shane Hurlbut. Editing: Angie Lam and Joel Cox.

Cast: Andy Lau, Jean Reno, Shu Qi, Zhang Jingchu, Yo Yang, Eric Tsang, Sha Yi, You Tian-Yi, Karel Dobry.


Yen and Lau Go Bad in “Chasing” Teaser

Get ready to see action hero Donnie Yen in a whole new light in the upcoming true story-inspired Chasing the Dragon.

Yen plays “Crippled” Ho, a Mainland China-based immigrant who arrives in 1963 Hong Kong and rises through the ranks to become a notorious drug lord, with a corrupt police officer named Lee Rock joining him.

Playing the role of Lee Rock is the legendary Andy Lau, who actually played the character in a 2-part film series from director Lawrence Lau in 1991.

Jason Kwan and Wong Jing directed this film with Wong writing the screenplay. Co-starring are Kent Cheng, Philip Keung, Wilfred Lau, and Michelle Hu.

Well Go USA has acquired the North American rights while a release date for Hong Kong is set for this Fall.


Well Go USA Lands Fung’s “The Adventurers”


Stephen Fung‘s latest action adventure film will be landing in the U.S. thanks to the gang at Well Go USA.

The Adventurers, a loose remake of the classic John Woo film Once a Thief, stars Andy Lau as a thief who after a three-year imprisonment sets out on a major heist in Europe with a French detective, played by Jean Reno, hot on his trail.

Shu Qi, Eric Tsang, Tony Yang, and Zhang Jingchu co-star in the film which Fung and Lau serving as producers with a script by Fung, Cheung Chi-Kwong, Andy Lo and Steve Ha.

The film will get its Chinese release on August 11 and Well Go USA’s release is coming in the near future. In the meantime, check out their trailer for the film:

H/T: Film Combat Syndicate


Andy Lau Rocks in Trailers to Two Films

As World Film Geek continues to send its Get Well wishes to Hong Kong icon Andy Lau, who has recently gave an update and saying he is tough and recovering well, we can see Lau in action in two upcoming films this year. Here are the trailers for these films!

In April’s Shock Wave, directed by Herman Yau, Lau plays a bomb disposal officer for the Hong Kong Police who finds himself at odds with a deadly terrorist who seeks revenge on him for the imprisonment of his brother and allies. The film co-stars Jiang Wen, Philip Keung, Babyjohn Choi, and Felix Wong.

This summer’s The Adventurers, directed by Stephen Fung, Lau is out of prison and is forced into a heist with Jean Reno as the setup man with the likes of Fung’s wife Shu Qi and Yo Yang among the team who help Lau and Reno pull off the heist. The film was shot on location in Prague.

This year gets a double dose of Andy Lau after making his Hollywood debut in The Great Wall. Shock Wave comes in April in Asia and The Adventurers will be released in Asia this summer!


TEASER: Shock Wave

Herman Yau‘s upcoming action film has released a teaser trailer on what to expect.

Shock Wave stars Andy Lau as a bomb disposal unit officer in Hong Kong who has learned a terrorist has returned to cause chaos. It is up to him and his team to stop this evil madman.

The film is due for release in April from Universe Films and Bona Film Group.


Update on Andy Lau Injury

Andy Lau

World Film Geek sends out a safe and speedy recovery for Hong Kong Heavenly King Andy Lau, who last week was seriously injured during shooting of an ad in Thailand.

Lau, who makes his Hollywood debut in the upcoming film The Great Wall (already released in China and Hong Kong amongst others), has been in the Hong Kong entertainment industry for three and a half decades. Lau was injured in Thailand last week when he fell off a horse while shooting an ad for Tao Ti beverage, which Lau has been its spokesperson since 2000. His injury hit worldwide news.

Yesterday, Lau’s company Topman Global made an official statement with an update on the Hong Kong actor/singer. Lau will remain hospitalized for a period of six to eight weeks and then will be forced to take the next nine months to fully recover from a torn pelvis and miscellaneous bone fractures and muscle injuries in the area.

In addition to The Great Wall, Lau has four films scheduled for release this year: Herman Yau‘s action thriller Shock Wave; Stephen Fung‘s heist film The Adventurers; Jason Kwan‘s Chasing the Dragon which he starred opposite Donnie Yen; and a rumored appearance to reprise his role in Cold War III at the end of the year. The last one is currently up in the air as well as a series of concerts he was scheduled to perform. Topman Global promises to give updates on Lau.

As the Lunar New Year approaches, World Film Geek sends out an early “Kung Hei Fat Choi” to Andy Lau and his family and a safe and speedy recovery.

For more information, check out Focus Group Holdings Limited, the official website for Andy Lau and his companies.

H/T: HKSAR Film No Top 10 Box Office


Dance of a Dream (2001)

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Hong Kong’s answer to the 1996 hit Japanese film Shall We Dance? Has not one but two interconnecting stories that merge into one fun dance film.

At a social event for a company run by siblings Tina and Jimmy Cheung, Namson Lau and his partner Shirley are the grand finale. Namson is a dance instructor who performs to pay the rent for his current dance studio. He long dreams of making himself well known as a top dance instructor. At the event, hiring waitress Kam eyes Namson and becomes infatuated with him and would love to dance with him. As for Tina, whose business mind has made her lose her smile, Jimmy decides to hire Namson to teach her to dance to bring her smile back.

Kam joins Namson’s studio and joins a beginner’s group that includes couple Mr. and Mrs. Yip; club girl June, and Fatty, who looks for self-esteem through dance. Kam finds the class fun, especially when Namson, Shirley, and co-founder Faye join in. As for Tina, when she wants Namson to dance with her at an upcoming social event, she takes the training seriously to the point where it takes Kam to help Tina finally see that dancing is more than just dancing. As for Kam, will she finally get the chance to live her dream to dance with Namson and will Namson also realize his dream to get his big studio?

Before hitting it with big with the epic trilogy Infernal Affairs, director/cinematographer Andrew Lau and writer Felix Chong collaborated on this underrated dance dramedy that not is about dreams, but the power of friendship, both long-standing and new. Having an ensemble cast led by three iconic Hong Kong actors really makes this film a fun millennial dance film that is more akin to films such as Shall We Dance and Strictly Ballroom. Perhaps, one can even say that this is a meshing of both films wrapped in one little package.

Andy Lau, who also served as the film’s producer, is wonderful as Namson, who while attempting to achieve his dream of running a big dance studio, unknowingly changes the lives of two women. Anita Mui goes through the most change of the film as the seriously-minded Tina, who is seen as so close minded that she disapproves of her brother’s carefree style. However, she soon learns that dancing is meant to be fun as well as taken seriously and it takes an invite to a barbecue that shows Tina’s softer side. Sandra Ng’s Kam may come off as a bit obsessive, and she does go as far as getting a job as the studio’s cleaning lady in exchange for the lessons. While this usually present a creepy side, it ultimately becomes likable due to the fact that she not only gets close to Namson, but becomes good friends with the other students at the studio.

One of the funniest scenes is actually the barbecue, the pivotal scene for Tina’s change of mood. It starts with Lau dressing up in drag to perform one of Leslie Cheung’s classic songs and getting cheers from everyone. Then, the core cast of the film delves into a musical number filled with some fun dance sequences mixed in. And yes folks, the cast themselves from pop legends Lau and Mui to supporting cast members Ng, Gordon Lam, Ronald Chung, Lam Tze-Chung, Stephanie Chung, and Cherrie Ying actually sing in the film. The film does end on a high note and is set on Christmas.

Dance of a Dream is not a romantic comedy, but a fun dance film that revolves around change and friendships. Despite lifting elements from other dance film classics, this film is truly an underrated gem of a film, thanks to the performances of its cast and some great direction and cinematography by Andrew Lau.


Media Asia Films presents a Teamwork Motion Pictures Ltd. production. Director: Andrew Lau. Producers: Andy Lau and Andrew Lau. Writer: Felix Chong. Cinematography: Andrew Lau and Ko Chiu-Lam. Editing: Danny Pang and Curran Pang.

Cast: Andy Lau, Anita Mui, Sandra Ng, Gordon Lam, Edison Chen, Ronald Cheng, Suzanne Chung, Cherrie Ying, Lam Tze-Chung, Shirley Huang, Belinda Hammett, Halina Tam.