The “Replace”-ment: An Interview with Rebecca Forsythe

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The daughter of veteran actor William Forsythe, Rebecca Forsythe has been doing quite well in the film industry. She played the role of Clarissa in We Are Your Friends and appeared alongside her father in her film debut Strike Force in 2003 and then as Jake LaMotta’s estranged daughter in The Bronx Bull in 2016. She gets her first lead role as Kira, a woman who suffers from a very rare skin condition in Replace, which is currently available On Demand.

World Film Geek had the chance to talk with Forsythe about her lead role debut.

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Rebecca, I was blown away with your performance in Replace. It was a film that was both mindblowing and at times disturbing, but for the most part very good.
Oh my God! Thank you so much! I agree it was a bit disturbing, but this is so great to hear!

What attracted you to the role of Kira?
Well, I’m still a bit fairly new to acting so I heard about the audition. I went in and I loved how complicated the character of Kira was. However, I had little doubt about getting the role and I thought I wasn’t going to get it. But, I did get it and I really enjoyed playing Kira.

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Kira (Rebecca Forsythe) and Dr. Crober (Barbara Crampton) in Replace (Uncork’d Entertainment)

I spoke with your co-star Barbara Crampton, and she had nothing but absolute praise for you. What was it like working with her on the film?
She is so wonderful! She is a veteran of horror films and I was so nervous at first about meeting her. I thought to myself, she is a great horror film actress, like in Re-Animator. We were the only two Americans in the cast as we shot the film in Germany. We got along really well and we actually collaborated on the chemistry between our characters.

We would sit down and instead of one of us going, ‘I’m going to do this’, for instance, Barbara would ask me, ‘what if I did this in this scene’ and I would come back with ideas. We collaborated very well, and it was so funny because we would get a certain scene set up where she nice off set, but once the cameras rolled and the director said “action”, she’d come out as cold. It was terrifying at times (Laughs)

She had mentioned that for her role, she researched the aspects of aging and revolutionary technology that is being done to treat diseases and all. Being involved with this film, what’s your take on this issue?
Oh yes, she was telling me about all this stuff with science and aging while we were on-set. To be honest, I personally would love to age naturally. I am 29 years old now, but let’s face it. In the world of acting, people compete for roles and it’s due to their looks and beauty. But from my personal viewpoint, I do believe in aging naturally and I praise these older women who have embraced their age today. You know, you can ask me the same question in 20 years (Laughs).

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Lucie Aron as the mysterious Sophia in Replace (Uncork’d Entertainment)

What was it like working with Lucie Aron, who plays the mysterious Sophia?
She became one of my best friends on the set. She was so hungry when it came to the role and we got to be so close. For instance, when we would prepare for a scene together, she would pretty much take care of me, sing a song in French, rub my shoulders. She wanted to make sure I was comfortable, and I think that’s how the relationship between Kira and Sophia was in the film. It was complicated, but it made sense. But Lucie was so wonderful to work with.

What was it like working with director Norbert Keil? He and cinematographer Tim Kuhn did an amazing job with the visual side of things.
Omg! Those visuals I totally agree! Tim did a phenomenal job on the film. As for Norbert, he was and still is, a wonderful friend who I consider family. I would come up with ideas for the character and he would come up with ideas, so we collaborated well. We only had two weeks of rehearsal, but we got through it and we’ve been keeping in touch since. He will send me family pictures on occasion and yeah, he’s someone I consider family to this day.

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Kira (Rebecca Forsythe) discovers the “new” secret of beauty in Replace  (Uncork’d Entertainment)

As in a way, you’re playing someone who subjects people to torture and death all in the name of beauty, did you feel at times a bit grossed out with the gore scenes?
Yes, especially the scene where I have the girl in the bathroom after the club. I was in that place. I sat in the corner crying and Norbert came up to me and asked me if I was ready. I went ahead and did the scene and I thought it was fun. But before the cameras roll, I was in that very shocked place.

Where your subconscious takes over and gives you a realistic thought but once you are ready to shoot, you go into the “let’s do this” mode.
(Laughs) That’s exactly what it is. It is very cathartic.

Finally, what can we expect next from you?
Well, I’m hoping to get a project I’m writing off the ground eventually. I’m writing it with a friend and it is a period piece about insanity. As for acting, I will be on an upcoming episode of FBI: Most Wanted, the spinoff of FBI, the Dick Wolf show that came out last year. Other than that, let’s see where this goes. I just moved to New Orleans, which is where my family is from, and Halloween here is the best!

Replace is now available on DVD and On Demand. This was a very well-done film that meshes body horror and science fiction with a real issue that’s on going today. Rebecca, you did an excellent job on the film and it was great talking to you.
Thank you so much and I hope I get to do another movie soon and get to talk to you about it! It’s been a pleasure!

A Special Thank You goes to Clint Morris at October Coast PR and Rebecca Forsythe for making this interview possible.

 

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